Economics

What’s Wrong with Bernie Sanders’ 32-Hour Work Week Bill

A shortening of the hours of work is a highly desirable goal. But it cannot be achieved along with growing prosperity except in a free market.

The Myth of the Myth of Barter

The Myth of the Myth of Barter

There is, after all, at least one impulse among humans that’s more deep-seated than their “propensity to truck, barter, and exchange.” I mean, of course, their propensity to let themselves be thoroughly bamboozled.

A Monetary Policy Primer, Part 5: The Supply of Money

A Monetary Policy Primer, Part 5: The Supply of Money

On the Fed’s “instruments of monetary control,” which include devices for regulating the total quantity of bank reserves and circulating Federal Reserve notes, and also for regulating the quantity of bank deposits and other forms of privately-created money that will be supported by any given quantity of bank reserves.

A Monetary Policy Primer, Part 2: The Demand for Money

A Monetary Policy Primer, Part 2: The Demand for Money

How can a central bank manage a quantity without being certain just how to define, let alone measure, that quantity? How is it possible for the quantity of money supplied to differ from the quantity demanded? When those things do differ, how can one tell? Finally, just what does “the demand for money” mean?

The Free Market versus the Bureaucratic State

The Free Market versus the Bureaucratic State

As Ludwig von Mises explained, an enterprise or activity is either guided by the pursuit of profit or it is not: Make profits by satisfying consumers better than the market supply-side rivals or meet the legislative mandate of the government bureau or agency by following the rules and procedures specified in your job description.

America’s National Debt Bomb Caused by the Welfare State

America’s National Debt Bomb Caused by the Welfare State

The Federal debt has now crossed the $19 trillion mark. When George W. Bush entered the White House in 2001, Uncle Sam’s debt stood at $5 trillion. When President Bush left office in January of 2009, it had increased to $10 trillion. Now into seven years of Barack Obama’s presidency, the Federal debt has almost doubled again.

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