S.M. Oliva

S. M. Oliva is president of Citizens for Voluntary Trade and a senior fellow at the Center for the Advancement of Capitalism.

The Crusading Lawyers

Lawyers are supposed to act as advocates, defending the individual rights of their clients before the law. In any controversy, be it civil or criminal, the case must revolve around the parties, not their counsel. Yet that is no longer a guiding principle for many...

No Preschooler Left Behind

Thomas Watkins, Michigan's superintendent of public schools, is on a mission to expand his authority beyond the traditional K-12 boundaries. If given his way, every child in the state--practically from birth--would become the exclusive property of state authorities....

Discriminating Against Achievement

This weekend, the Duke and University of Connecticut's women's basketball teams will square-off in a nationally televised #1-vs.-#2 contest. Coincidentally, this matchup comes the same week that a Bush administration advisory panel completes its recommendations for...

Reason, Not Pretense

The cloning debate resumed late last December with the announcement--still unconfirmed--that a cloned baby was born to an American woman. This report essentially mocked the consensus that emerged in Congress over the past year, which agreed that reproductive cloning...

Forcing Newspapers to Publish Against Their Will

This Monday the U.S. Justice Department crossed the line when they decided the First Amendment no longer applied where antitrust issues are concerned. According to today's New York Times, the DOJ will announce a "consent decree" today with Village Voice Media and New...

The Future of the Airwaves: Feingold’s Anti-Property Bill?

Senator Russ Feingold, Wisconsin Democrat, announced on January 7th, 2002 that he would sponsor legislation to limit the number of radio stations a single company could own. Feingold seeks to challenge the looming relaxation of ownership rules sought by Federal...

New York Times Co. Condones Theft

Last December The Center for the Advancement of Capitalism (CAC) issued a report addressing the continuing controversy between the National Council of Women's Organizations and the Augusta National Golf Club. CAC's report was not meant to assess Augusta's membership...

Standing Up to Racism

The Bush administration is currently debating whether to file briefs in a pair of affirmative action cases now before the Supreme Court. The cases, arising from admissions policies at the University of Michigan, involve that school's explicit use of race in assessing...

Zoning and the The “New” Property Rights

Last Tuesday, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit ruled in the case of George Washington University v. District of Columbia, upholding the District's zoning restrictions on GW's land use. The case was by no means a landmark decision, yet the...

New Senate Leader Must ‘Do No Harm’

Incoming Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist is well known for being the Senate's only doctor. A heart surgeon by training, Sen. Frist has occasionally made the news for coming to the rescue during his tenure in office, including an incident this weekend, where he...

The NFL’s Race Problem

On Saturday, the New York Jets and Indianapolis Colts will face off in the opening round of the 2003 NFL playoffs. The coaches of the two teams, the Colts' Tony Dungy and New York's Herman Edwards, will have a reunion of sorts, since both men worked in Tampa Bay,...

Killed by the ‘Living Wage’

Businessmen in Santa Fe, New Mexico, are going to court to defend their most basic economic right--the ability to voluntarily negotiate wages with their employees. Last month, the Santa Fe city council voted to raise the minimum wage to $10.50 per hour over the next...

FCC Tunes Out Consumers

Last month, on August 9th, the Federal Communications Commission issued a final order to carry out its 1997 congressional mandate to "phase in" High Definition Television (HDTV) over the next five years. The order says that in 2007, all television signals must be...

Individual Rights Loses a Round to ‘Democracy’

"Judicial activism" is a term which gets thrown around far too much, and often too erroneously, when criticizing the acts of federal judges. Most judges are, regardless of political persuasion, fairly timid creatures who balk at acting against the perceived popular...

 

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