Unlocking the Jobs Dilemma

by | Apr 11, 2010 | Investing

Productive, private-sector jobs – the lifeblood of a sound economy – are under assault by politicians in the United States and Western Europe, who have unwittingly taken a number of steps that make future job losses a foregone conclusion. In the 1980s, as a Member of the UK Parliament and elected Chairman of the Conservative […]

Productive, private-sector jobs – the lifeblood of a sound economy – are under assault by politicians in the United States and Western Europe, who have unwittingly taken a number of steps that make future job losses a foregone conclusion.

In the 1980s, as a Member of the UK Parliament and elected Chairman of the Conservative Small Business Committee, I led discussions on the issue of job creation. At that point, the British labor market was dealing with technological advances that threatened traditional industries and an influx of highly competitive Eastern European workers who drifted westward in the waning days of the Cold War.

Pushing back against those who wanted to preserve an untenable status quo, the Conservatives recognized that defensive measures like excessive regulation, high taxes, and favored bidding for government contracts were antithetical to business growth. Fortunately, Margaret Thatcher was Prime Minister. Her understanding of economics, combined with her ability to communicate and lead, resulted in the adoption of pro-business polices. The British economy soon flourished, creating many profitable new jobs.

Despite his rhetoric to the contrary, the Obama Administration is actually leading the US in the opposite direction. By raising taxes on business owners, monopolizing credit, and increasing business regulations at a frightening pace, current policy is turning the employment landscape into a rather sterile promontory.

Meanwhile, the media has selectively focused on the recently passed jobs bill, which includes meager tax-credits for new job hires. If this bill has any effect, it will be to encourage cash-strapped entrepreneurs to make hiring decisions that are unjustified by current business activity.

In reality, employment’s future is being decided in the credit markets. Here, the Fed’s zero interest rate policy is redirecting investment capital towards government. When banks can borrow from the Fed at zero percent and buy long-dated U.S. Treasuries yielding 3 to 4 percent, there is little incentive to take the risks inherent in business lending. Business credit is, therefore, tighter than even a severe recession would ordinarily dictate. This lack of credit is starving the private sectors’ ability to create jobs.

Furthermore, the current ‘progressive’ activism on display in Washington is breeding great uncertainty in the board room, making businesses even more cautious in an exceptionally difficult planning environment.

In fairness, the seeds of job destruction in America were sown years before Obama rose to power. In recent decades, in response to intense lobbying by big banks and corporations, some key changes were made that reduced market flexibility. These included abolition of the Glass Steagall Act and the weakening of anti-trust laws, without concurrent efforts to remove preferential treatment for those companies deemed “too big to fail.” These moves appeared to extend the free market, but in reality they allowed big banks and corporations, like Citigroup, AIG, and GM, to squeeze out smaller competitors in good times and fall back on government support in bad times.

The increased powers of the crony capitalists were used to drive down the prices of suppliers, many of whom were small businesses or farmers. At the same time, financial profiteering created ownership wealth on an unprecedented scale, greatly increasing the wage gap between owners and workers.

Finally, the creation of the largest speculative asset boom in history by former Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan led inevitably to a massive bust, causing economic hardship and dislocation for millions. If the likely double dip recession occurs, even more jobs will vanish.

Most American job losses in recent decades were due to outsourcing to more competitive economies, because of the harmful effects of our domestic government policies. Big spending by government now is unlikely to cure this deleterious situation. The only realistic solution is to shrink government and remove subsidies and guarantees to big business. The United States must become fundamentally competitive once again by unleashing the power of the entrepreneurial spirit. Otherwise, the “giant sucking sound” of good jobs heading overseas, as Ross Perot famously described it, will only grow louder.

John Browne is the Senior Market Strategist at Euro Pacific Capital.

The views expressed above represent those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors and publishers of Capitalism Magazine. Capitalism Magazine sometimes publishes articles we disagree with because we think the article provides information, or a contrasting point of view, that may be of value to our readers.

Related articles

Stocks and Bonds Hurt Alike Under Stagflation

Stocks and Bonds Hurt Alike Under Stagflation

When bonds and stocks decline a lot and simultaneously it suggests inflation is rising rapidly even as the economy is stagnating or contracting (or will soon do so). For most economists today, that combination is near-impossible.

Equity Performance Amid One-Party Rule in America

Equity Performance Amid One-Party Rule in America

If history (especially more recent history) is a guide, U.S. equity gains over the next two years of full Democratic control will be inferior, a result that is more probable given that the party is currently more anti-business, anti-profit, and anti-capitalist than at any other time since 1970.

No spam. Unsubscribe anytime.

Pin It on Pinterest