Ten Stock-ing Stuffers

by | Dec 20, 2002

In January 1995, I started offering readers a list of 10 stocks to consider for the year ahead, making my selections from the choices of market pros whose opinions I value. In five years of this exercise, my lists returned an annual average of 24 percent, compared with 28 percent for the benchmark Standard & […]

In January 1995, I started offering readers a list of 10 stocks to consider for the year ahead, making my selections from the choices of market pros whose opinions I value. In five years of this exercise, my lists returned an annual average of 24 percent, compared with 28 percent for the benchmark Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index. My sabbatical spared me the ignominy of almost certain losses from 2000 to 2001, but I’m back for another try for 2003 – a bit early, so you can do your stock shopping in time for Christmas.

Before we get to the numbers, a few warnings:

1. It’s never easy to beat the market as a whole. Although my picks did pretty well, you would have been better off with an index fund from 1995 to 1999.

2. While the stocks below are selected for their prospective performance over the next 12 months, I do not believe in owning stocks for only a year. Think of this list as a set of ideas for further study and, among the 10, search for the companies you want to own forever.

3. As it turned out, the portfolio is weighted toward smaller stocks, perhaps because they are simply more interesting than the big brand-name companies. The final list is well balanced by sector, but it includes four large-caps, four mid-caps and two small-caps.

4. No guarantees.

Here, then, is the list for 2003, in alphabetical order . . .

Ambassador Glassman has had a long career in media. He was host of three weekly public-affairs programs, editor-in-chief and co-owner of Roll Call, the congressional newspaper, and publisher of the Atlantic Monthly and the New Republic. For 11 years, he was both an investment and op-ed columnist for the Washington Post.

The views expressed above represent those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of the editors and publishers of Capitalism Magazine. Capitalism Magazine sometimes publishes articles we disagree with because we think the article provides information, or a contrasting point of view, that may be of value to our readers.

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